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Art at Site 	www.beijingart.info	Bruce	Beasley	Gathering of the Moons
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Bruce Beasley

Gathering of the Moons

2008
Bird’s Nest Stadium
Website
www.dailycal.org:
Beasley’s 17-by-17-foot stainless steel sculpture “Gathering of the Moons” in front of the Bird’s Nest Stadium in Beijing. It is set to stay in China. Walking to UC Berkeley from the Downtown Berkeley BART station, onlookers have noticed a peculiar development. A cluster of interlocking rings marks the campus’s westernmost entrance. And it’s crawling with kids.
The creator, Bruce Beasley, could not be more delighted. The sculptor is a rock star in the art world. With more than 200 exhibitions internationally and dozens of public art commissions in numerous cities, Beasley has had a string of continuous successes in his 55-year career. From art galleries to public parks to airports worldwide, Beasley’s presence borders on ubiquitous. His largest sculptures fetch more than $1 million on the market. Most prominently, he made a splash at the 2008 Olympic Games in Beijing with a sculpture commission for the Olympic park.

www.sfgate.com:
If people want to see the Olympic rings in Bruce Beasley's "Gathering of the Moons, a giant sculpture composed of slicing steel discs, that's OK by him. But it's not what he had in mind when he made the shimmery piece now standing in Beijing. Sculptor Bruce Beasley makes it big in Beijing. Oakland sculptor Bruce Beasley one of 20 artists commissioned to create work for Olympics. Sculptor, Bruce Beasley inside his Oakland, California, studio on July 9, 2008, with a work in progress that is using intersecting discs as a theme. Beasley has been commissioned and already installed a sculpture at the Olympic Village in Beijing, China for next months games. Sculptor, Bruce Beasley inside his Oakland, Calif., studio on July 9, 2008, with a steel scupture, "Disc Cantana", that he created which is similar to the piece now installed in Beijing, China. The piece uses intersecting discs as a theme for the art. Beasley has been commissioned and already installed a sculpture at the Olympic Village in Beijing, China for next months Olympic Games. If people want to see the Olympic rings in Bruce Beasley's "Gathering of the Moons, a giant sculpture composed of slicing steel discs, that's OK by him. But it's not what he had in mind when he made the shimmery piece now standing in Beijing. "It didn't even occur to me, says Beasley, one of 20 international sculptors commissioned by the Chinese government to make big pieces for Beijing's Olympic Park. "I was working with these forms for about nine months before I got the commission. Artists always want to do their latest work. I was excited about these new shapes and didn't think about the Olympic connection." The piece has a certain dynamism and movement, says the prolific Oakland abstractionist, whose works in cast acrylic, bronze, steel and aluminum can be found in museums, parks, airports and universities around the world. But beyond that, he'll let the sculpture speak for itself in the visual language of form and void. Beasley has carved granite in Xiamen, the coastal Chinese city with an ancient history of stone work, and had a show last spring in Shanghai. But this 17-by-17-foot sculpture is the first piece he's made that will stay in China. "Up till now, everything I did in China came here, says Beasley, 69, a genial man with a graying beard, a curious mind and a large appetite for work. "I was outsourcing. I'm one of those guys who's ruining the economy, he adds with a laugh.